Throughout the year, Community Health Improvement at The University of Vermont Medical Center presents FREE educational programs offering healthy lifestyle classes, multi-week workshops and screenings.

Pre-registration is required. Please note class location and directions are provided upon registration. FREE parking is available onsite for all classes. Class sizes may be limited.

For more information, call 802-847-2278.

HealthSource Classes - 2015

Food Matters Cooking Series

Have you ever longed to create delicious and healthy food in a beautiful and professional kitchen? Food Matters is an invitation to experience food and health in a whole new way. The University of Vermont Medical Center has partnered with the South End Kitchen to deliver a series of 3 cooking classes designed around a health topic. Join a Culinary Institute of America trained chef and a registered dietitian from The University of Vermont Medical Center to explore health topics in a delicious and creative way.

Please note: Registration is required and class size is limited! Registration is required for EACH class below:


Kitchen Confidence - Part of the Food Matters Cooking Series

Do you feel intimidated by your kitchen? Overwhelmed by what this or that knife or gadget is for?   Staggered by the idea of doing more than boiling water or heating up jarred spaghetti sauce? Then this is the class for you! This class will help you navigate the basics of creating simple, healthy dishes that won’t take all day or break your bank to prepare. Learn basic kitchen and cooking skills, so you can serve easy meals that maximize the health benefits of your raw ingredients as well as showcase their beauty and tastiness.

By: Maryann Ludlow, MS, RD and Leah Pryor, Line Chef

DATE: Sunday, January 25
TIME:1:00-3:30pm
LOCATION: South End Kitchen, Burlington

This class is currently full. We apologize for any inconvenience


The Science of Taste - Part of the Food Matters Cooking Series

Oriental medicine believes balancing flavors in your food promotes physical and mental well-being.  A dish that includes sweet, spicy, sour and salty flavors is more enjoyable than one that concentrates only on one or two flavors. The craving for food that is not healthy for us can happen pretty quickly in a culture where food is laced with chemicals and extra sugar, fat, and salt. This class will help you to bring more pleasure, and health, to your meals when you learn to give your body what it wants and needs.

By: Kimberly Evans, MS, RD and Leah Pryor, Line Chef

DATE: Sunday, February 8
TIME: 1:00-3:30pm
LOCATION: South End Kitchen, Burlington 

Please note: This class is currently full. We apologize for any inconvenience. Please feel free to contact us to be placed on the waiting list.


Culinary Kids - Part of the Food Matters Cooking Series

One of the best ways to teach kids about healthy eating is to teach them how to cook healthy foods that they will look forward to eating. This class will offer a safe and professional environment for kids to work side-by-side with a University of Vermont Medical Center registered dietitian and Culinary Institute of America trained chef, and to learn some basic kitchen skills while creating seasonal specialties and kid friendly cuisine. (8-12 year olds only)

By: Kimberly Evans, MS, RD and Leah Pryor, Line Chef

DATE: Sunday, February 22
TIME: 1:00-3:30pm
LOCATION: South End Kitchen, Burlington 

Please note: This class is currently full. We apologize for any inconvenience. Please call us at 802-847-2278 if you would like to be put on our waiting list.


Wild Wisdom of Weeds: 13 Plants for Human Survival

Author Katrina Blair has written the first book on foraging and edible weeds to focus on thirteen plants found all over the world. These global survival plants (dandelion, thistle, mallow, plantain to name a few) each represents an essential food source and extensive medical pharmacy and first-aid kit. These plants help to regenerate the earth while supporting our own survival; they grow everywhere where human civilization exists; they are easily identifiable; they are medicinal with minimal preparation; they are ecological succession plants; and, they are commonly free and accessible to anyone living anywhere in the world. Take part in the journey to heal ourselves, both in body and in spirit, in an age when technology, commodity agriculture, and processed foods dictate the terms of our intelligence. There will be a book sale and signing after the talk.

By: Katrina Blair, Author, Professor, and founder of Turtle Lake Refuge 

DATE: Tuesday, February 3
TIME: 6:30-8:00pm 
LOCATION: Davis Auditorium, Medical Center Campus 

  Register


Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation

How can mushroom cultivation help us manage, or at least make use of, invasive species and thereby reduce dependence on herbicides? Is it possible to develop a low-cost and easy-to-implement mushroom-growing kit that would provide high-quality edible protein and bioremediation in the wake of a natural disaster? For more than twenty years, mycologist Tradd Cotter has been pondering these questions and researching for answers. Join him for an in-depth exploration of best organic mushroom cultivation practices, for both indoor and outdoor growing of a wide variety of species. Cotter takes “organic” one step further by introducing an entirely new way of thinking—one that looks at the potential to grow mushrooms on just about anything, just about anywhere, and by anyone. There will be a book sale and signing after the talk.

By: Tradd Cotter, Author, Microbiologist, Professional Mycologist, Organic Gardener, and founder of Mushroom Mountain

DATE: Monday, February 16
TIME: 6:30-8:00pm
LOCATION:  Davis Auditorium, Medical Center Campus 

  Register


The Nourishing Homestead

Join Ben Hewitt as he offers practical ways to grow nutrient-dense food on a small plot of land. Ben, his wife Penny, and their sons, have much experience in this area. On their homestead in Cabot, they maintain copious gardens, dozens of fruit and nut trees and other perennial plantings, as well as a pick-your-own blueberry patch. In addition to these cultivated food crops, they also forage for wild edibles, process their own meat, make their own butter, and ferment, dry, and can their own vegetables. Their focus is to produce nutrient-dense foods from vibrant, mineralized soils for themselves and their immediate community. Reminiscent of The Good Life, by Helen and Scott Nearing, the Hewitts' story is sure to inspire a new generation of homesteaders, or anyone seeking a simpler way of life and a deeper connection to the world. There will be a book sale and signing after the talk. 

By: Ben Hewitt, Author, Homestead Consultant, and Professional Speaker

DATE: Tuesday, February 24
TIME: 6:30-8:00 PM
LOCATION: Davis Auditorium, Medical Center Campus 

  Register


Please note: Registration is required and class size is limited! Registration is required for EACH class.

Health Screenings

  • Blood Pressure Screenings
  • Cholesterol Screenings 
Call 802-847-1624 for times and locations.

Past Classes

  • Cheese and Culture - by Paul Kidstedt, Professor of Food Science in the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences at the University of Vermont
  • Food Diversity, Human Health and Climate Change - by Gary Nabhan, W.K. Kellog Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of Arizona
  • Rebuilding the Food Shelf - By Philip Ackerman-Leist, Green Mountain College
  • Climate Change and Vermont - By Alan Betts, Ph.D., Atmospheric Research
  • The Science of Taste

Related Documents

Healthsource Class Schedule 2015 Download PDF

Note: Adobe Acrobat Reader is needed to view PDF documents